We Use Math Video


Would you like to help us make this dream a reality?
We need your help.

The BYU Department of Mathematics is working to help inspire young people to study mathematics by producing a series of several high-quality, short films about careers and opportunities in mathematics. The introductory segment has already been produced, and you can view it here or by downloading it below.
Each of the remaining films will highlight a specific career area in mathematics by featuring people who work in that career, what they do, why they like their job, what kind of problems they work on, and how they came to work in that career.

The Films
Here is the current outline of some of the films we plan to produce in this series:

Please feel free to redistribute these films for non-commercial use.

The Goal: boost interest and enrollments in mathematics
Our primary goal is to substantially boost the number of students studying mathematics at every level and thereby increase the number of well-qualified, technically skilled workers in America. To accomplish this we plan to do the following:

  • Get every high school mathematics student in America to see these films and
  • Get every student who sees one of the films to walk away saying, "The people in that film have great jobs, working for great companies, doing exciting things, using mathematics. I want to do that, too."

To reach as many high school and college students as possible, we plan to make the film series easy and attractive for math teachers to use in their classrooms. Among other things, we hope to send a free copy of the whole series on DVD to every high school math teacher in the country, make the films freely available from our website WeUseMath.org, and post the films on other streaming media sites like Yahoo Video and YouTube.


Bios

Jessica Purcell, mathematics professor
Jessica Purcell, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of mathematics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. Her areas of interest include three-dimensional manifolds, hyperbolic geometry and knot theory.
Dr. Purcell earned her Ph.D. in mathematics from Stanford University after receiving bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from the University of Utah and the University of Michigan, respectively. She taught at Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin before joining the faculty at Brigham Young University.

Jeff Stewart, energy researcher
Jeff Stewart is the program leader for the Western Region Energy Analysis Consortium at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California.

Gus Hart, physics professor
Gus Hart, Ph.D. is an associate professor of physics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah.  His interests include solid state physics, alloys and materials research.
Dr. Hart received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of California, Davis after earning degrees in Japanese and physics from Brigham Young University. He has done research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California and at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Colorado.

Ira Pramanick, software engineer
Ira Pramanick, Ph.D., is a staff software engineer on Google’s analytics team. Dr. Pramanick has held positions with various high-tech companies in the Silicon Valley, including IBM and Sun Microsystems. She has also worked at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.
She holds a Ph.D. in electrical and computer engineering from the University of Iowa and a B. Tech. in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology.

Tyler Jarvis, mathematics professor
Tyler Jarvis, Ph.D., chairs the Department of Mathematics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He teaches courses in geometry, algebra and calculus and performs research in algebraic geometry relating to moduli spaces of curves.
Dr. Jarvis received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Princeton University after earning master’s degrees in mathematics from Princeton and Brigham Young universities and his bachelor’s degree, summa cum laude, from BYU.

Zachary Vorhies, software engineer
Zach Vorhies works as a computer programmer with Google, Inc., where he optimizes graphic performance in software development. Previous to his position at Google, he has held computer engineering positions with LucasArts in San Francisco, California, and Pipeworks Software in Eugene, Oregon.
He studied computer science, mathematics and psychology at the University of Oregon.

Helen Moore, scientist
Helen Moore, Ph.D., is a senior scientist providing modeling and simulation for biotechnology and pharmaceutical company Pharsight in Mountain View, California. Her research entails mathematical modeling of diseases for optimizing drug therapies. Prior to working at Pharsight, she held a similar position with Genentech, and taught at Stanford University in California and Bowdoin College in Maine. She has also served as associate director of the American Institute of Mathematics (AIM), based in Palo Alto, California.
Dr. Moore holds a Ph.D. in mathematics from SUNY Stony Brook and graduated from the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics at UNC in Chapel Hill.

Dennis Tolley, actuary
Dennis Tolley, Ph.D., teaches courses in actuarial science and statistics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. He has also taught at the University of North Carolina, Duke University and Texas A&M University, and has performed research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, as well as at universities in Japan and China.
Dr. Tolley holds a bachelor’s degree in statistics from Brigham Young University and earned his Ph.D. in biostatistics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In addition to his academic degrees, he became an associate of the Society of Actuaries in 1981.

Daniel Faissol, bioscience researcher
Dan Faissol, Ph.D., does research involving medical treatment of disease at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California.
Dr. Faissol holds a Ph.D. from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Carol Meyers, security analyst
Carol Meyers, Ph.D., works in the Engineering Directorate within the Systems and Decision Sciences section of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. Her career field includes optimization and probabilistic modeling in support of projects in counterterrorism and stockpile stewardship.
Dr. Meyers earned her Ph.D. in operations research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Prior to studying at MIT, she earned her bachelor’s degree in mathematics at Pomona College in California.

Shane Reese, statistics professor
Shane Reese teaches courses in statistics at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah. Previous to working at BYU, Dr. Reese worked as a statistical scientist and taught at Iowa State University. He also did nuclear weapons research at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. His research interests include sports statistics, and Bayesian hierarchical models and design.
Shane earned his Ph.D. in statistics from Texas A&M University after earning his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in statistics from Brigham Young University.

David Bailey, technologist
David Bailey, Ph.D., does computational research at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California. His research involves high-performance computing, and computational and experimental mathematics.
Dr. Bailey earned his bachelor’s and his Ph.D. degrees, both in mathematics, from Brigham Young University and from Stanford University, respectively.

Xabier Garaizar, defense analyst
Xabier Garaizar, Ph.D., is the deputy director of the Center for Applied Scientific Computing at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California. Dr. Garaizar’s research interests include the analysis and development of algorithms for the solution of systems of partial differential equations.
He holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from the University of the Basque Country and a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Michigan.

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Administrator
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WeUseMath.org

We are excited to share with you this resource website to help boost interest in mathematics! Our website is evolving so we hope you will visit often to see the new additions and changes.

We are currently attending the Joint Math Meetings in New Orleans. Please come visit our exhibitor booth #912. Lots of free resource materials and prizes are available!

Nikatsekpe Oris...
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mathematics partnership

your site is wholesome. I am of the view to be part of this project in encouraging students to embrace mathematics as a subject. To make mathematics intresting and lovely, i wish to go back to the classroom to impact the knowledge to reedeem many from fear and dislike for the subject. Here in nigeria, similar behaviour like that of America is highly exhibited. it is a thing of sleepless night to the government of nigeria. with your tools such as video and dvd given to teachers will go along way to solve such problem. I want to be involve in America or in Africa.An Industrial Mathematician by profession.

gullit
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License

What is the license of this content ? Creative Commons or something like that ?

sbrasier
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Middle School Pre-Algebra and Algebra

This is great. I hope you make more videos they help in my math classes.

gracetaylor
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I learned a lot from this video.

I didn't ever realize how important math was in life until I watched this clip. This video has taught me that no matter what your job is, you pretty much always use math. For example, if you know enough math, you could be an engineer a chemist a scientest or even just a cashier if you are too lazy to do anything else. Even if your at the store but all you have is 20 dollars you need to be able to add and multiply to see if you have enough money for your groceries. This video has taught that if you are good at math life will be so much easier. You will be more successful than if you didn't know math at all. The better you are at math the more pleasing your job will be to you.

gracetaylor
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Grace Taylor~ Period 8

After watching the video I realized how much our world needs math. In almost all jobs you need to know math. Whether you are a chemist, a scientist, an engineer, or even just a cashier, math is very needed in them all. For example someones at the store, see even their you need to use math, you only brought 20 dollars. So while your shopping you are adding and multiplying all different kinds of things. The video was very interesting, and I did honestly learn a lot from it. If you want to have a happy successful life you need to learn math. If you do learn math then your job will most likely be more pleasing to you.
Grace
period 8

(sorry i accidently replyed twice)

Sam Dotson
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Sam Dotson - 8th period

Math is very important. You need math to do a lot of jobs. Math gets easier as you work harder at learning it. It's a language that we need to use everyday. Math is in our every day lives.

Nathan Johnson
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per.6

Math is the most important subject of all. If we never knew what math was, we would be so dumb! It's just like saying bring $5.00 to get a $20.00 shoe or shirt. we need math, most importantly for jobs. If you want to be an achect that does use ALOT of math.That video changes me to a new level in math if you screw up on building a tower and mis calculate 1 little thing your done.(i might have mispelled achitect....sorry)

Emma Beeler
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Emma Beeler ~ Period 6

After watching this video i learned that math has a big purpose in life, without math life would be nothing there would be no computers, no phones, no electronics, we need math to live. Without math we wouldn't have Roaring Springs water park or the mall or anything, math is life. You need math to be successful in life for example to get a good job you will need to know some math to succeed at that job. I learned that without math we would be useless. We couldn't do anything or go anywhere or buy things and to buy things you need to make them first and to make them you must know how to use math. We may not realize it but we use math everyday of our lives.

Emma Beeler
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Emma Beeler ~ Period 6

After watching this video i learned that math has a big purpose in life, without math life would be nothing there would be no computers, no phones, no electronics, we need math to live. Without math we wouldn't have Roaring Springs water park or the mall or anything, math is life. You need math to be successful in life for example to get a good job you will need to know some math to succeed at that job. I learned that without math we would be useless. We couldn't do anything or go anywhere or buy things and to buy things you need to make them first and to make them you must know how to use math. We may not realize it but we use math everyday of our lives.

Emma Beeler
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Emma Beeler ~ Period 6

Oh and sorry for commenting twice, my computer does that a lot.

neeljackson
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Helping hand

Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) said, 'The universe cannot be read until we have learned the language and become familiar with the characters in which it is written. It is written in mathematical language, and the letters are triangles, circles and other geometrical figures, without which means it is humanly impossible to comprehend a single word. Without these, one is wandering about in a dark labyrinth'

neeljackson
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The queen of the sciences

Gauss (1777–1855) referred to mathematics as "the Queen of the Sciences".[7] Benjamin Peirce (1809-1880) called mathematics "the science that draws necessary conclusions".[8] David Hilbert said of mathematics: "We are not speaking here of arbitrariness in any sense. Mathematics is not like a game whose tasks are determined by arbitrarily stipulated rules. Rather, it is a conceptual system possessing internal necessity that can only be so and by no means otherwise,

guillermoperotta
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New Math...

New Math emphasized mathematical structure through abstract concepts like set theory and number bases other than 10. Beginning in the early 1960s the new educational doctrine was installed, not only in the USA, but all over the developed world.

Much of the publicity centered on the focus of this program on set theory (influenced ultimately by the Bourbaki group and their work), functions, and diagram drawings. It was stressed that these subjects should be introduced early. Some of this focus was seen as exaggerated, even dogmatic. For example, in some cases MW3 Guide pupils were taught axiomatic set theory at an early age. The idea behind this was that if the axiomatic foundations of mathematics were introduced to children, they could easily cope with the theorems of the mathematical system later.

The most common question students ask math teachers at every level is “When will I use math?” WeUseMath.org is a non-profit website that helps to answer this question. This website describes the importance of mathematics and many rewarding career opportunities available to students who study mathematics.


 

Attorney
$187,199/yr
Actuary
$160,000/yr
Cryptanalyst
$137,780/yr
$126,000/yr
Physician
$187,199/yr
$128,330/yr
$82,990/yr
$165,000/yr
$113,068/yr
$187,199/yr

Figures represent salary potential.

20
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